TZ Jollyness - шаблон joomla Создание сайтов

  1. Overview
  2. Itenary
  3. Package Details
  4. Equipments
Shishapangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders. It was the last 8,000 meter peak to be climbed, due to its location entirely within Tibet and the restrictions on outside visitation to the region imposed by the Chinese during the 1950s and later. The mountain has two summits, the commonly climbed Central summit that the Chinese say is 8013m (7999m on old maps) which we have reached four times. Naturally, we will be aiming to climb to the higher true summit, 8027m (26,335ft), let's see if we can get there!

Before the Chinese opened Tibet to western mountaineers in 1978, little was known about Shishapangma. The only 8,000m peak to lie entirely in Tibet, it lies tantalizingly close to the Nepalese border, shrouded behind the great, but less high, border peaks of Langtang. Enterprising individuals sought mere glimpses of it during the period that other 8,000m peaks were receiving their first ascents! It is perhaps not surprising that it was the last of the 8,000m peaks to be climbed. Not that its ascent by the North-West Ridge presents any great difficulty. On the contrary, it is now regarded as one of the most straightforward 8,000m climbs and its summit is frequently achieved.

Regarded as a 'holy' mountain by the local Tibetan population, and lying on the route to Mt. Kailash, Shishapangma continues to baffle us. Historians cannot fathom her names - Shishapangma, Xixabangma, Gosainthan. Yet, the mountain is perhaps the most accessible of her genre, rising only a few miles west of the Kathmandu-Lhasa Highway. It was 16 years before the mountain received its second ascent, by a West German team in 1980, and it has been climbed every year since.


Day 01- Arrival in Kathmandu Airport (1345meters).
Kiwi sherpa representative will meet you at Airport and transferred to hotel by private tourist vehicle. Overnight at hotel.

Day 02: Kathmandu Valley Sightseeing(1350m):
After breakfast our tour guide will take to sightseeing around Kathmandu valley such as Boudhanath stup,one of the biggest Buddhist shrines in the world,where we observe Buddhist monks in prayer in the monesteries then visit to Pashipatinath,the most famous Hindu temple in the country,located in the banks of Bagmati river where you can see Hindu holy men are meditating,pilgrims bathing and occasionally funeral pyres burning on the ghats.From here we visit Durbar square then we back to hotel and introduced your leader/guide and we will provide an opportunity for ask any questions about the trek .This includes a final briefing and preparations for the trip and we supplied with our trek pack and information for tomorrow.
In the pre trip meeting all pasengers must bring
Passport.
Four copies of Passport size photos each.
Travel Insurance policy.
Note pad
Writing pen

Day 03- Official formalities in Kathmandu.

Formal briefing in the Ministry of Tourism. Today, the expedition leader will also check everyone's equipment. Overnight at hotel.

Day 04- Final Preparation day in Kathmandu. Overnight at hotel.
The last opportunity to buy anything missing.

Day 05- Fly from Kathmandu to Lhasa (3660meters). Overnight at hotel.

Early morning transfer to the international airport for the hour-long flight to Lhasa. This stunning flight, on a China Southwest Airlines Boeing 757, takes us right across the main Himalayan range and provides us with magnificent mountain views. After landing at Gongar Airport and meeting our local Tibetan Sherpa, it is a further 2-hour drive by Land cruiser to Lhasa. It's advisable to rest and take it easy for the remainder of the day due to Lhasa's altitude. Overnight at hotel.

Day 06- Sightseeing in Lhasa. Overnight at hotel.
We spend today visiting several of Lhasa's many monasteries in the company of a guide and interpreter. One of these is the Sera Monastery, one of the best-preserved monasteries in Tibet, within its whitewashed walls and golden roofs, several hundred monks live and study. After lunch we'll visit the Norbulingka, the summer palace of the Dalai Lama, as well as the Jokhang Temple.

Day 07- Second day of sightseeing in Lhasa. Overnight at hotel.
In the morning, we visit Potala Palace which dominates the city of Lhasa it’s a spectacular building, containing private quarters of the Dalai Lama as well as numerous grand state rooms and many important chapels. . After lunch, we visit the Drepung Monastery, which was founded in the 14th century and was once the largest in the world, with a population of around 10,000 monks.
Day 08- Drive to Shigatse (3900 meters), 6 hours. Overnight at hotel.
We set off in jeeps across the Tibetan plateau. Soon after leaving Lhasa, we reach the banks of the Tsang Po, which becomes the Brahmaputra River when it enters India. We drive up-stream for a while before turning southwest through barren desert-like valleys to reach Shigatse, Tibet's second city. Overnight in a hotel.

Day 09- Drive to Xegar (4000 meters), 6 hours. Overnight at hotel.
As we continue along the Tibetan highway, the northern edge of the Greater Himalaya comes into view, often providing a spectacular panorama of peaks, including Everest. We overnight in a hotel 7 kilometers outside the main town of Xegar. If there is time, we may be able to visit the main town and its hilltop monastery.

Day 10- Acclimatisation Day. Overnight at hotel.
This is an important day which will help is cope with the big height gain to Chinese base camp tomorrow. The general advice is to take it easy, but a visit the main town and a gentle hike up to its hilltop monastery (4,200m) are highly recommended.

Day 11- Drive to Shishapangma base camp (5000 meters). Overnight at tented camp.

Magnificent views of Shishapangma and many other mountains make today's road journey an unforgettable one. After crossing the Thang La (5,200meters) we turn off the Lhasa highway and head west along the road to Mount Kailash for a further 25 km. Turning south onto an even smaller track, we eventually arrive at base camp (5,000meters). This is situated close to the Yambughangala River, which drains the north side of Mt. Shishapangma.

Day 12 and 13- Base camp preparation. Overnight at tented camp.
Our first couple of days at base camp are spent preparing our equipment and organizing loads for the yaks to go up. These are also important days for our acclimatization, as we will all feel the effects of living at 5,000 meters and we need to be in good shape for the long route to advance base camp.

Day 14- Move to Advanced Base Camp (5600 meters). Overnight at tented camp.
After loading up the yaks with all of our equipment, we set off with them on the 12 mile/20 kilometer trek to advance base camp. Initially we follow a jeep track to a plateau above the river and then the west bank of the valley to ABC (Advance Base Camp) near the snout of the Yambughangala Glacier (5,600meters). This is in a very impressive situation, with the giant white pinnacles of the glacier leading up the valley to Shishapangma. Here we unload the yaks and set up the camp, which is the take-off point for the climb. From here the Sherpas have to do most of the load carrying.

Day 15 to 40- Climb period of Shishapangm.
Above Advance Base Camp we will place two or three camps depending on conditions. The climb starts with a long traverse leading to a large camping area at 6,400meters. From here we traverse further, gaining a lot of height, to reach the shoulder of the mountain and camp 2 (7,100meters). All of the climbing is on scree or snow and presents little difficulty. The North-West Ridge is easily reachable from camp 2, although it may involve snow and ice climbing up to 50° steep. Fixed ropes are placed on all steep/crevassed sections. If a high camp is required, it is placed according to the prevailing conditions. The summit ridge is very long and it is usual to take a rising diagonal line across the snow slope below it to reach the ridge as close to the summit as possible. The West Summit (8,008meters) of Shishapangma is quicker to reach than the main summit and is the usual point reached by 'summiteers'. Plenty of time has been allowed in case of bad weather and slow acclimatization. We intend to have enough time at the end of the expedition to make a complete withdrawal from the mountain, removing all equipment and rubbish and taking it back to ABC.

Climb
The expedition leader in discussion with the team members and sherpas manages the day to day running of the expedition. The sherpas carry the majority of the equipment to establish the camps leaving us to familiarize ourselves with the mountain and get more acclimatized, a long process. There are several different methods to ready for yourself for the summit bid, we will discuss them in detail on the mountain.

The basic plan is to spend 3-4 days at ABC then take a 6-7 day trip up on the mountain sleeping as high as Camp two, 7100m. Logistically, it takes some sound preparation and organization to ensure all the camps are set up with the appropriate supplies. Then we need a window of good weather for the summit attempt and often this is a waiting game.

Summit route options
Summit day start very early in the morning. The best route to the true summit is crossing the face (in green above, and the picture to the right) but we judge at the time whether this is safe.

The route in yellow goes first to the Central summit, which we must fix, ropes too. From there to the true summit is a knife-edged ridge that is rarely in condition for traversing, although it is only nasty for less than a rope length.

The other possibility is a new route (in blue): from Camp 3 we descend a little onto a broad plateau and will probably have to put a camp there. The slopes from there on are moderate although there are a few crevasses.

Safety and the Conduct of the Climb
Many people have now climbed Shishapangma, the mountain and its potential dangers deserve respect by all those attempting it. Reaching the summit late in the day would be a serious mistake and our guides will ensure that sensible timings are adhered too. The aim of our expedition will be to get as many team members as possible to the summit. However, this will not be to the detriment of safety. Safety will govern all decision making on the mountain and will be based on the sound mountaineering judgment of our highly experienced mountain guides. To support our guides on the mountain, we Kiwi Sherpa will plan the expedition as thoroughly and carefully as possible using our own experience and knowledge of the mountain to maximum benefit. Ultimately, the leader will have sole discretion on the implementation of any plan to climb the mountain and he will ensure that safety remains the prime consideration.

The high mountains of the Himalaya, and Shishapangma in particular, are there for us to climb and to enjoy. Our priority will be to enable all team members to fulfill their potential on the mountain and to come home safely having had a life enhancing experience. Whether or not expedition members reach the top, the expedition should be an enjoyable and rewarding achievement that will form the basis of many long cherished memories and friendships.

Day 41 and 42 - Cleaning the mountain.
It takes several days to clear all the camps, and bring all our rubbish down.

Day 43- Packing Advance base camp.
More packing! Occasionally we can arrange for the climbers to leave ahead of the expedition leader and sherpas. We judge at the time.

Day 44- Trek Base Camp and drive Zhangmu. Overnight at guesthouse.
We trek to Base Camp then get the truck and Land cruisers there in the afternoon, heading to Zhangmu. Back to thicker air.

Day 45- Drive back to Kathmandu. Overnight at hotel and it's time for celebration.

We should arrive in Kathmandu late afternoon or evening ready to enjoy the good restaurants.

Day 46- At leisure in Kathmandu. Overnight at hotel.
Time for a relaxing and shopping and to celebrate the expedition. Kiwi Sherpa organize as a farewell party to thank the Sherpas and the team member for their support and friendship during the expedition.
Day 47- Transfer to international airport for your final departure.
We will transfer you to International Airport for you Departure by our private Van or Car.
PLEASE NOTE: The above itinerary is not a fixed program but is intended to give an indication of the likely events during the expedition. Please note that because of climbing above 8000 meters, it will be necessary to have a flexible plan in order to take the best advantage of situations as they present themselves. Any changes to the itinerary will be made with a view to maximizing the benefit to the team members and of ensuring their eventual success on the mountain.

Normally climbers will change their departure flights from Kathmandu when they know exactly when the expedition is going to end. We plan to stay at Base Camp for climbing as long as it takes us to be successful.

Team members should take out private insurance if they wish to be covered against cancellation due to medical or personal reasons.
Cost details:
To quote you with an exact price we need to know the number of persons in your group and the mode of transportation(by plane or by bus) .Please contact us with these details and any other inquires regarding this expedition then we get back to you on the cost details.
Price Includes
1. Airport / Hotel / Airport pick up & drop by private car / van / bus.
2. Standard twin sharing accommodation hotel in Kathmandu breakfast included-as per itinerary
3. Guided city tour in Kathmandu by private car / van / bus.
4. Full board meal during the tour/trek and camping at base camp, prepared by our cook with hot Tea & coffee.
5. All base camp and Advance base camp camping gears (We will provide fully water proof dining tents, kitchen gears, dining table, chairs, toilet tents, shower tent at the base camp and advance base camp)
6. High quality tents for all camps.
7. Insurance for all Nepali staffs and porters including helicopter rescue provision.
8. Boiled and purify drinking water for the trek and at base camp.
9. Expedition permits
10. Liaison officer and his round trip flight, insurance, wages, expedition equipments etc.
11. High altitude climbing food, fuel, Gas above base camp (you are also advised to bring some high altitude food yourselves)
12. Guide, cook, porters, helpers up to base camp
13. Climbing Sherpas
14. A well stocked first aid and medical kit sufficient to counter any possible mountaineering ailments, from headache to serious injury.
15. Oxygen equipment for medical use and summit (from 7,000m) only.
16. A portable hyperbaric chamber (Gamow bag)
17. Emergency communications on the mountain and satellite communications link for helicopter evacuation..
18. Mask regulator
19. Sightseeing/Monument entrance fees.
20. Chinese visa and permit.
21.Power supply at Base camp for charging.
22.flight fair from Kathmandu-Lhasa including Airport tax.
23.All our Government taxes and vat.

Price Excludes

1. Lunch and dinner whilst in Kathmandu and in Lhasa.
2. Travel Insurance which cover emergency Rescue and Evacuation. (Kiwi Sherpa adventure trekking strongly recommends that you purchase a Global Rescue membership to protect yourself.
3. International airfare and airport departure tax.
4. Nepal entry visa fee (Tourist Visa with Multiple Entry for 90 days can be obtained by paying US $ 100 in Kathmandu airport up on your arrival. You will also require 2 passport size photos You can easily extend the visa if require.)
5. Items of a personal nature such as alcoholic drinks, cold drinks, laundry.
6. Personal trekking and Climbing Equipment.
7. Any others expenses which are not mentioned on Price Includes section.
8. Excess baggage charges.
9. Sherpa tip pool (See below)
10. Internet and sat phone.
11. Costs incurred as a result of delays or events beyond the control of Kiwi Sherpa adventure trekking.

Recommended tipping and Sherpa bonuses are as follow:
-Allow $100-150 for general non-sherpa crew who stay at base camp.
- Allow $150-200 for sherpas who go up to the base camp.
-Summit climbing Sherpa US$ 500 – 800 per Sherpa.
Equipment List
You will need clothing for dining in Kathmandu, trekking in the humidity and heat, and to protect you from the cooler temperatures in the mountains. This list is designed to help you choose the right gear for the demands of this trek and are the minimum required for this trip.

You are expected to provide the following personal equipment. These items are mandatory for survival in the mountains, so make sure you have everything on the list.

The emphasis on equipment necessary for mountain travel follows two simple tenets: Lightweight and Functional. Since you will be carrying all of your gear and a portion of the group gear, the items you choose to take should be lightweight, dependable, and adaptable to a variety of extreme conditions. The quality of the equipment you choose has a lot to do with how warm, dry, and safe you will remain so be critical of quality and the proper fit of clothing. Comfort lends itself to a more enjoyable experience!

The layering system outlined is usually sufficient for most people, but if you tend to be colder, bring one extra medium layer such as a vest, which would be ideal for extra warmth around camp. When making the final decision as to what goes into your pack, remember that it's a fine science of taking just enough clothes and accessories to do the job, while not over-burdening yourself with items you probably will not use.

Cotton clothing must be avoided because it dries very slowly and is a poor insulator when wet. Instead, choose wool or synthetic fabrics that "wick" the sweat and moisture away from your skin to keep you much warmer.

Climbing Gear
- Alpine climbing harness. Must have adjustable leg loops and fit over all clothing.
- 2 locking carabiners. Large, pear-shaped carabiner is best, screw gate type recommended
- 3 regular carabiners. Lightweight; BD Hot wire are recommended.
- Ice axe w/leash. Light weight (Grivel Air tech, Black Diamond Raven, or Charlet Moser Snow Walker). Under 5’7” use 60cm; 5’7”- 6’2” use 65cm; over 6’2” use 70cm.
- Plastic Mountaineering boots (Koflach Degree, Lowa Civetta, or Scarpa Alpha) or Leather Double Mountaineering boots (La Sportiva Olympic Mons, Boreal GI or equivalent; must be mountaineering/crampon compatible)
- Crampons. Must be fit to plastic boots prior to trip, new-matic type recommended; include a simple repair kit (Grivel G12, Black Diamond Contact, or Charlet Moser Super 12)
- Adjustable trekking poles.
- Belay/rappel device (Figure 8 preferred)

Upper Body
- 2 cotton t-shirt.
- 1 polypropylene t-shirt.
- 2 long sleeve polypropylene shirts. Lightweight, light colored for sunny days.
- 2 women sports bras. Synthetic, no cotton!
- 1 Softshell. Marmot Dri-clime Wind Shirt, Patagonia Stretch Zephur or Krushell Jacket (R2 pullover acceptable).
- Down/synthetic sweater or vest. Patagonia Puffball Jacket or Sweater preferred; R4 Jacket acceptable
- Hard shell jacket with hood. Water proof and breathable. Gore-Tex or equivalent is best, roomy enough to fit over multiple layers.
- 1 expedition down parka with hood. This is probably your most important piece of clothing! It is important that your jacket is 700+ fill down, baffle construction (not sewn through seams) and has a thick insulated hood

Hand Wear
You will require two systems: one glove system for lower on the mountain and a mitten overmitt system for the cold temperatures encountered on summit day.
- 2 pair liner gloves. Thin wool or polypropylene.
- 1 pair warm gloves. Fleece or wool.
- 1 pair expedition shell gloves.
- 1 pair modular expedition shell mitts. Or Pro Mitts. If they do not have wrist straps consider sewing one on so that you can either attach it to your jacket or cinch the strap to your wrist so that you do not lose your mittens in high winds.

Head Gear
- Warm hat. Wool or synthetic that covers your ears.
- Balaclava
- Face mask.
- Shade hat or baseball cap.
- Glacier glasses. 100% UV protection with side shields and a hard-sided storage case (e.g. Julbo or Cebe)
- 1 pair extra sunglasses (also with UV protection in case your 1st pair breaks).
- 1 ski goggles with UV protection
- If you require prescription glacier glasses, you can get your lenses modified to your prescription.

Lower Body
- 4 pair of liner socks. Polypropylene or Capilene.
- 3 pair lightweight trekking socks.
- 2 pair medium-heavy wool socks. Check boot fit with liner and wool socks on.
- 1 pair nylon shorts.
- 1 pair nylon pants for trekking and around camp.
- 2 pair lightweight long underwear bottoms
- 1 pair fleece pants with side zipper or “puff-ball pants”
- 1 pair soft shell pants (e.g. Patagonia Guide pants or OR Granite Pants. Schoeller fabrics).
- 1 pair of hard shell pants. Waterproof/breathable with full side zips, Gore-Tex or equivalent is best.
- 1 pair gaiters. Make sure they will fit over plastic boots (OR Crocodiles or equivalent).
- 1 pair down booties (optional).
- 1 pair trail shoes for the hike to base camp and use at camp
- 1 pair sandals or tennis shoes for Kathmandu and in camp

All clothing should be kept dry using waterproof stuff sacks or large plastic bags.

Pack
- 1 lightweight internal frame pack (approx 4,000 cubic inches).
- 1 daypack is optional for the approach hike, possible use on summit day and carry-on pack. If you plan to use it for your summit pack it must be large enough for your down jacket, misc. clothes, food and water. The Lowe Alpine Neutrino or Black Diamond Speed 28 are excellent, lightweight (16 oz.) choices.
- 1 large (7,500+cu.in.) duffel bag for gear, must be durable for use on pack animals
- Small padlock for duffel bag.
- 1 small duffel bag for luggage storage in Kathmandu. We will supply complimentary duffel/kit bag for the item you buy in Kathmandu and also for the storage.

Sleeping Gear
- 1 down sleeping bag rated to -10 F (Gore Dryloft or similar fabric helps protect down and dark colors speed drying time)
- Sleeping pad. Full length closed cell foam (mandatory) and/or Therma-Rest for extra warmth and comfort

Miscellaneous
- 1 first-aid kit with ibuprofen and any other doctor recommended medications.
- Lip balm. At least SPF 20, 2 sticks. A string taped to the stick is helpful to hang around your neck
- Sunscreen. At least SPF 40
- Headlamp. Petzl Myobelt 3 or Black Diamond Polar Star.
- 3 Water bottles. 1 liter wide-mouth Nalgene (1 is a pee bottle).
- Hydration bladder with drinking tube for lower mountain (optional)
- 1 water bottle insulator.
- Pocket knife. Small Swiss-army type.
- Water purification. Iodine tablets or Polar-pure crystals
- Toiletry kit. Be sure to include toilet paper stored in a plastic bag.
- 3-4 Large plastic bags, for keeping miscellaneous gear dry.
- Nylon stuff sacks. For food and gear storage (OR has a good selection); large Ziplocs are useful also.
- Bandana.
- Camp towel.
- Ear plugs.
- Hand wipes.
- 1 small stainless steel thermos (optional).